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A December 22 article in the Boston Globe reported on Assistant Professor Jungwoo Lee and his colleagues in the Chemical Engineering (ChE) Department at UMass Amherst who are developing microenvironments that allow them to study how cancer cells that move around in the human body change from dormant to active, and also what causes or prevents that change. Understanding this process, the researchers say, could lead to new treatments that prevent cancer from metastasizing throughout the body. See News Office release.

Five College of Engineering Students recently participated in the first ever co-op program run by the Coca-Cola plant in Northampton, and, because of their superior performance, they were each asked to make five-minute presentations to 11 company plant managers from the Northeast region and one vice-president from the Eastern U.S. “This is Coca-Cola’s first iteration of its co-op program,” explained co-op participant and mechanical engineering major Michael Schwartz, “and the company as a whole is looking to possibly expand this program to other plants across the nation based on the success the UMass students in Northampton.”

A team of researchers led by Jungwoo Lee, an assistant professor in the Chemical Engineering Department and an investigator in the Institute for Applied Life Sciences, has developed an implantable biomaterial that recruits rare tumor cells and enables long-term observation of their micro-environmental evolution, according to highlights in Science Translational Medicine and Nature Biomedical Engineering. The Science Translational Medicine highlight explained that this approach could offer a method for quantitative evaluation of therapeutics that target long-term suppression of metastasis.

This semester Professor Shelly Peyton of the Chemical Engineering (ChE) Department instituted a new, sophomore-level course that gives ChE majors the kind of hands-on experience in lab experimentation that is distinctive for this department or any other in the country. And Peyton believes this hands-on lab will have a long-lasting impact on the future careers of the students who take it.

In an era marked by divisive political rhetoric about prejudice of many kinds, thank goodness for the UMass Amherst chapter of Out in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (oSTEM). Founded by award-winning chemical engineering major Phoebe Bisnoff ’19, the oSTEM mission is to provide a targeted, inclusive space for the LGBTQ+ community engaged in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics to connect and network.

Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement Michael F. Malone, the Ronnie and Eugene Isenberg Distinguished Professor of Engineering, has notified Chemical Engineering major Jun-Goo Kwak ’19 that he is one of eight students who have been selected this semester to receive the 2018-2019 UMass Amherst Rising Researcher student achievement award. This award recognizes exceptional UMass Amherst undergraduate students who excel in research, scholarship, or creative activity.

Read more about the award and previous recipients »

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the world’s largest general scientific society, has awarded the distinction of Fellow to Chemical Engineering (ChE) Professor Dimitrios Maroudas as one of 416 such designations by the AAAS this year. The AAAS says it has elevated individuals to this rank “because of their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.” As the AAAS explains, it is rewarding Maroudas “for innovative work on multiscale modeling of complex systems with emphasis on establishing processing-structure-properties-function relations in bulk, thin-film, and nanostructured materials.”

Professor Michael Henson of the Chemical Engineering Department has been selected as a 2018 Fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE). “It is with great pleasure and honor I welcome you to the select group of members of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers,” wrote Syamal Poddar, Ph.D., P.E, FAIChE, and the chair of the AIChE Fellows Council.

Inside UMass reports that two scientists at UMass Amherst, including Professor Sarah Perry of the Chemical Engineering Department, are building a new class of environmentally friendly polymer materials made from complex coacervates that contain solid nanoparticles. The scientists hope their research into these new complex coacervates will have a radical impact on applications ranging from polymer coatings to vaccine formulation.

See Inside UMass article: Scientists Make Polymers Containing Solid Nanoparticles.

In late October, College of Engineering Dean Tim Anderson will visit Ames, Iowa, to receive the 2018 Marston Medal presented by the Iowa State University College of Engineering. The Marston Medal recognizes alumni of the Iowa State College of Engineering for outstanding achievement in advancing engineering science, technology, or policy having national and international impact in academics, industry, public service, government, or other venues.

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