The University of Massachusetts Amherst
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Like any born engineer, Monique Farrell is a woman with a plan. In fact, she began designing her chemical engineering career as an eighth-grader, when she finished second in a national science competition. In short order, she later excelled at the High School of Commerce in Springfield with maximum honors and did three years of biotech related lab training, experiments, and workshops as part of the Baystate Hospital Education Partnerships after-school program.

Melissa St. Amand, a doctoral candidate in the University of Delaware’s Department of Chemical Engineering and an undergraduate alumna of the Chemical Engineering Department at UMass Amherst, will present her biotechnology research at the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) annual meeting on October 17. St. Amand’s presentation, entitled “Controllability Analysis of Protein Glycosylation in CHO Cells,” assesses the protein glycosylation and its role in improving quality control strategies in the biopharmaceutical industry. St.

In the September 23 issue of Science, considered by many to be the leading scientific journal in the world, the editors highlighted an article co-authored by, among others, David Schmidt of the Mechanical and Industrial Engineering Department and Paul Dauenhauer of the Chemical Engineering Department. The Science editors cited an article entitled “Aerosol generation by reactive boiling ejection of molten cellulose,” first published in the September 6 web version of Energy Environmental Science. Besides Schmidt and Dauenhauer, the other researchers were Andrew R.

On November 15, the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) will honor UMass chemical engineering alumnus Marvin O. Schlanger at the AIChE International Year of Chemistry Gala at Gotham Hall in New York City. Schlanger ('72 M.S., ChE) ) is the former president and chief executive officer of the ARCO Chemical Company, and he delivered the 10th annual Tang Lecture at the College of Engineering in 2009.

The College of Engineering welcomes five talented new faculty members to our ranks for the fall semester of 2011: Alice Azadeh Alipour and Caitlyn Butler in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department; Mario Parente and Marco Duarte in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department; and Jessica Schiffman (pictured) in the Chemical Engineering Department. Their research interests include sustainable development, energy efficient water treatment, interplanetary remote sensing, signal, image, and data processing, and desalination and sustainable water purification.

A research team from the University of Massachusetts Amherst, led by Paul Dauenhauer, assistant professor of chemical engineering, has received a two-year $600,000 grant from Re Community Inc., a resource recovery company headquartered in Charlotte, N.C. The grant will support the development and evaluation of an innovative new fuel for coal-fired boilers.

On July 29, a behind-the-scenes article by Robert Coolman, a graduate student in the lab of George Huber of the Chemical Engineering Department, was posted on the popular LiveScience website in partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF). Coolman’s article explained the groundbreaking research on green gasoline being performed in Huber’s lab, which has been described in such prominent publications as Scientific AmericanScience, and MIT’s Technology Review. His work is being supported by large grants from the NSF, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Energy.

What if we could save lives with a more accurate early detection radar system for tornadoes such as the one that recently hit Springfield? Or what if we could help amputees walk more easily by giving them a better “feel” for their artificial limbs? Or replace our unsustainable oil supply with sustainable biofuel? Or cure a group of child-killing diseases known as lysosomal storage disorders. Are these just pipedreams? Not for 52 undergraduate engineering and science students doing summer research at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

On July 19, the Institute for Cellular Engineering (ICE), whose Director is Susan Roberts of the Chemical Engineering Department, is staging an outreach event for 10 local high school students designed to introduce them to the complex and fascinating world of cellular engineering. “Essentially, the students are high school students from Springfield and Holyoke,” says ICE Program Manager Shana Passonno, “and students from the Institute for Cellular Engineering are organizing a day of laboratory demonstrations and activities, lab tours, and an undergraduate panel session about life as a college student.”

An event initiated last year by the Institute for Cellular Engineering (ICE) has mushroomed this summer into a campus-wide career exploration forum for graduate students and post-docs. “The First Five Years: What to Expect?” was held on Wednesday, July 13, in the Integrated Sciences Building on campus. “Are you hoping to start your career on the right path?” the program's poster asked. “Gain valuable insights from accomplished industrial and academic professionals, as they reflect upon their early career experiences.”

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